Dating the birth of jesus and astronomy

In Genesis, God explains His purpose for creating all those lights in the universe.

He said, “Let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years; And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth; and it was so”“The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.

The recent discovery of the Book of Commandments and Revelations manuscript of D&C 20, however, showed that the verse was actually an introductory head note written by early church historian and scribe John Whitmer — something he did for many of the revelations, Harper said.

Harper, a BYU assistant professor of church history and a volume editor of the Joseph Smith Papers, said in a phone interview that some people, including Elder Talmage, have read this verse as if it is the Lord speaking and revealing precisely that Christ was born 1,830 years before that day and that the revelation was given on April 6, 1830.

D&C 20 begins with this introductory verse: "The rise of The Church of Christ in these last days, being one thousand eight hundred and thirty years since the coming of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the flesh, it (the church) being regularly organized and established agreeable to the laws of our country, by the will and commandments of God, in the fourth month, and on the sixth day of the month which is called April." Steven C.

The date of April 6 comes from the date that the LDS Church was originally organized in 1830.

Attempts to identify the star with historical celestial phenomena have been inconclusive at best, leading many to dismiss the gospel account as a beautiful but imaginative myth.

Still others keep returning to this question, knowing that if we could only link the star with a specific celestial event, we could also pinpoint the date of Jesus’ birth.

The Jewish leaders were nervously expecting the Messiah to identify himself just when Christ was about to begin His adult ministry (John –27).

This latter interpretation coheres with the purpose for which God created the stars in the first place—as a celestial calendar.

“Then God said, ‘Let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs and seasons, and for days and years.’” (Genesis ). He lives with his wife Marie and their homeschooled children in Mankato, Minnesota, where he teaches American history, history of science, and bioethics at Bethany Lutheran College.

For although today we celebrate the birth of Jesus in 1 C. I believe that Babylonian astronomy may provide the key to identifying the star and to dating Jesus’ birth: That’s because the Gospel of Matthew tells us that the magi—astronomers from the East—believed that the star would lead them to a new king.

E., most scholars believe he was actually born sometime between 7 and 4 B. E., based on the Gospel of Matthew, which indicates that Jesus was born late in the reign of King Herod of Judea, who died in 4 B.

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